In China, employees amuse themselves with antics and cross-dressing at annual corporate dinners

January 31, 2011Jing Gao3 Comments, , , , , ,

As Chinese New Year draws near, the nation’s companies and employers are busying wrapping up the Year of Tiger with laughter and festivity. Annual dinners and parties are hosted right before the long holiday, and employees and even bosses laid their heads together to contribute to the long-awaited party of their own. Many netizens who commented on the photos also think that after a year of hard work, it is high time that everybody went wild.

While many of such amateurish shows are original and/or impromptu, many also borrow ideas from internet and pop culture and remake or restyle existing shows. Cross-dressing has also become a key to bringing the house down.

Besides shows, such get-togethers at the end of the lunar year usually have lotteries as a form of reward for employees, the prizes being either cash wrapped in red envelopes, or gifts of varying values. A famous Chinese tweet jokingly says, “At the company’s annual party, someone won an Apple IV (referring to iPhone 4) from the lottery draw, while I won four apples.”

In the wake of the rise of the sharing culture, many shows that used to be limited to a company are now made available online. A lot of Chinese internet users, mostly younger ones have said that they’ve sworn off the annual CCTV New Year Eve Gala, for it’s full of cliché and bureaucratic tone, and look forward to grassroots shows.

Photos from: Sohu, Sina

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A two-man comic show, with one hiding behind and doing the speaking or singing while the other staying in the front and doing the lip-synching.

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“Imperial concubines of the Qing Dynasty”

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Lady Buddha with a thousands hands

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“The One-Child-Policy-breaking couple in exile”

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Cross-dressing becomes a key to bringing the house down.

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“The Dying Swan”

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Audience consisting of employees and perhaps family members applaud performers.

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Costume stores usually make huge profits from the demand for cheap costumes for such annual dinners.

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